the power of producing

day 1: 10/11/17

tim and I are currently on a work (read: surf) trip down in tassie. so, for better or worse, we decided that we would document and share our experiences, conversations, and ideas along the way. the plan is to post something each day. the posts will be some combination of photos and words. whatever we capture through our lenses, and whatever my pen decides to manifest, we'll share. hopefully they'll be at least half-interesting. enjoy (all three of you who read this). 

 this morning's setup. we got some really crispy shots on our canon Eos but the sd card wiped itself and so we lost it all (it still hurts).

this morning's setup. we got some really crispy shots on our canon Eos but the sd card wiped itself and so we lost it all (it still hurts).

the following words were inspired by a conversation that tim and I had last night about the mindset shift that we've undergone as individuals - our transition from consumers to producers and what that transition has taught us.


we often feel as though life happens to us, rather than the other way round. making, creating, producing, changes that; for to manifest something into the physical world is to experience first-hand the powers of the mind. it affords a new perspective - one that is far more empowering, far more liberating. the process of producing teaches us that we all have the ability to influence, to mould, to shape. by producing, one begins to appreciate that the world we live in, the objects we interact with, even the food we eat, is the creation of real people - of producers. the good, the bad. the beautiful, the ugly. aside from nature, it's all produced, created, and made by people no different to you and i. 

 this morning's surf at roaring beach (otherwise known as the edge of the world). 4-5 ft of sweet sweet, salty (and f*cking cold) goodness. 

this morning's surf at roaring beach (otherwise known as the edge of the world). 4-5 ft of sweet sweet, salty (and f*cking cold) goodness. 

the trouble is, we tend to think of ourselves, and are referred to as, "consumers". we consume voraciously. we buy, a lot. so it's not as if the shoe doesn't fit. but it's extremely limiting. it limits us to thinking that our job is merely to passively consume what others have created. if the consumer identifies a problem in the world, he or she waits for someone else to solve it. the producer, on the other hand, sees the world for what it is: an incomplete job with cracks and holes. instead of complaining about how big the cracks are, how they've never been bigger, or how the government doesn't care about the cracks - or the holes - the producer gets to work. they begin to seal the cracks, to fill the holes. where the "consumer" sees problems, the "producer" sees opportunities. of course, that doesn't mean that the producer is always successful. sometimes they might even make things worse. and not all production advances the common interest. some production is downright malevolent (toxic illicit substances, illegal arms manufacturing etc.). but that's human nature for you - it's as diverse as nature itself. knowing this, that anyone is capable of producing, good things and bad, places an imperative on those with a social conscience to pick up the tools at their disposal and get to work. for the world is not only a battle of ideas, but a battle of things - a battle of production. just as we need more good ideas in order to overpower the bad, we also need the number of skilled and well-intentioned producers to outweigh the thoughtless, incompetent, and dangerous. thankfully, it has never been easier to produce. the tools are more powerful and more accessible than ever before. and there's another cause for optimism: we humans, for the most part, are a pretty good sort. we're capable of great things. we care. we are empathetic. and we can be touchingly altruistic. if we can combine these qualities, the best of human nature, with the producer's mindset, we will begin to seal the cracks and fill the holes, together, making the world a better place. 

 shipstern bluff lookout - as good a place as any for a snack. 

shipstern bluff lookout - as good a place as any for a snack. 

fair is out attempt to translate these ideas and insights into action. it's our manifestation of them. we chose to work on food because it's the area - the industry - most in need of change. it's the world's most polluting industry, has catalysed an obesity epidemic of epic proportions, and fails to distribute enough food to around a billion people. it's a mess. and as the world's population continues to grow rapidly, set to reach north of 11 billion by the end of the century, the problems are only bound to get worse. unless things change, of course. and that's the plan: to drive change within the industry, to clean up the food sector, to provide (and produce) more nutritious, more sustainable alternatives to current foods and drinks. in doing so, we hope we can empower others to leverage the powers of production in order to affect change; to take matters into their own hands and produce things that solve a genuine problem, to make art that touches lives, to mould and shape the world for the better. we are all consumers, and that brings with it a responsibility to consume well. but we can also all be producers. we have the tools, we just need to start using them. 

 she's not much, but she's home (for the night) - Clifton beach. 

she's not much, but she's home (for the night) - Clifton beach. 

Nathan McNiece